Leo & Randy On Conferences

Leo was recently asked to pinch hit as a keynote speaker at a conference in San Diego for a highly specialized audience.  Realizing his “power of peers” message had little to do with what the conference was all about, he understood it had everything to do with why they were there – to learn, connect and grow.  This inspired him to create a new keynote titled, Maximizing the Value of Your Conference Experience.  During our conversation today, we talk about how to tap into the greatest resource at these kind of events – your fellow attendees.

We also touch on the Washington Nationals sweep of the St. Louis Cardinals and the value of the special people who make a difference in our lives.

Useful links:

Leo’s updated speaking page is here

Keep up with Leo’s latest writings in CEO WORLD Magazine

Leo’s books – The Power of Peers and What Anyone Can Do

The Peer Advantage – Randy’s online/virtual peer advisory group for SMB owners (currently accepting applications)

Subscribe to the YouTube channel

Connect with Leo on Linkedin | Twitter | Instagram

Connect with Randy on Linkedin | Twitter | Instagram

Leo & Randy On Accountability

Today we discuss Leo’s latest CEO WORLD Magazine article entitled, Peer Advantage And Why CEOs Should Care About It. Previous Vistage CEO Rafael Pastor crafted an accountability model for CEOs to illustrate the powerful resource of empathetic accountability found in a peer advisory group. The Power Of Peers, co-authored by Leon Shapiro and Leo Bottary includes that model.

Keep up with Leo’s latest writings in CEO WORLD Magazine

Leo’s books – The Power of Peers and What Anyone Can Do

Leo’s speaking and workshops

The Peer Advantage – Randy’s online/virtual peer advisory group for SMB owners (currently accepting applications)

Subscribe to the YouTube channel

Connect with Leo on Linkedin | Twitter | Instagram

Connect with Randy on Linkedin | Twitter | Instagram

Leo & Randy On Politics

Today’s show isn’t about partisan politics. It’s not a conversation intended to further the polarization within our country. Quite the contrary, it’s about the power of collaboration and all the benefits we may be missing in our collective failure to wake up and figure this out. Today’s topics include compassion, forgiveness, consideration, cooperation, and collaboration.

An emotional moment of extraordinary forgiveness

Leo’s books – The Power of Peers and What Anyone Can Do

Leo’s speaking and workshops

The Peer Advantage – Randy’s SMB online peer advisory group*
*Currently accepting applications – apply today

Subscribe to the YouTube channel

Connect with Leo on Linkedin | Twitter | Instagram

Connect with Randy on Linkedin | Twitter | Instagram

Rich Karlgaard On Late Bloomers

Our guest today is Rich Karlgaard, publisher and futurist for Forbes and author of a new book, Late Bloomers: The Power of Patience in a World Obsessed with Early Achievement.

Are all high achievers early achievers?

Can mature individuals with life experience add value to a workplace?

Does personal and professional growth have an expiration date?

Helpful links from today’s show:

Buy the book: Late Bloomers: The Power of Patience in a World Obsessed with Early Achievement by Rich Karlgaard

Connect with Rich via his website: RichKarlgaard.com

Vested Interest. Positive or Negative?

It’s funny how language can inspire aha moments.  I love Sekou Andrews‘ work for that reason, because for me, he offers much more than clever turns of phrase.  When you unpack his brand of poetry, there’s always such rich meaning to be extracted if you take the time to do so. He has since inspired me to look for that deeper meaning no matter who mouths the words.

So during a workshop I conducted for a Vistage Emerging Leaders Group in San Antonio today, one of the members shared that the group was incredibly effective because the members had grown to develop a “vested interest” in the outcome for each of their member’s actions.  I immediately asked, “What do you mean by that?”

To digress for a moment, I’d like you to consider my frame of reference for asking the question.  When I grew up learning this stuff during my early days with Vistage, part of the value proposition was that CEOs and business leaders could meet with peers who had no “vested interest” in the outcome – meaning they had no financial or professional skin in the game.  The point was that they could receive impartial advice from people who knew exactly what it was like to sit in their chair and who had nothing to gain one way or the other.

The vested interest the member was referring to today was quite different. It was vested interest of a higher order.  It had nothing to do with personal gain.  It had to do with the emotional connection they’ve developed for one another when it comes to wins and losses.  While members may join a group without having a vested interest in their fellow members’ outcomes, one could argue that, over time, acquiring this brand of vested interest makes the group that much better.  If you think about it, this is exactly what every peer group should be shooting for.

Sekou says, “Tapping into the collective intelligence makes our whole greater than the sum of our smarts.”  I learn something new every time I work with a new group.  That’s why I love doing it so much!  A big thanks to Sekou Andrews and to everyone who challenges us to think about the world a little differently.

 

 

 

 

Announcing the WACD Minute!

The What Anyone Can Do Minute is a new video series created to accomplish two goals: 1) Give you a valuable takeaway in one minute; and, 2) use that takeaway as fuel to take a deeper dive toward doing the things anyone can do that most of us never will.

I’ll release 2-3 videos per week on my LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter feeds.  They’ll also appear on my website’s Video page, where you’ll find the entire collection as they go live.  I’ve released two this week already and by visiting https://leobottary.com/videos, you’ll get to preview the one I’ll be releasing in the next few days.

If there’s a topic you’d like me to cover, leave your suggestion as a comment, and you may find it featured in an upcoming episode of the WACD Minute!  Enjoy!

On Great Books

If you’re writing and speaking more than you’re reading and listening, it’s time to right the ship!  Here are three books you’ll love!  When you don’t have immediate access to the right people directly, you can still surround yourself with their ideas!  Enjoy!

Amazon links to the books (not affiliate links):

Cracking the Curiosity Code: The Key to Unlocking Human Potential by Diane Hamilton

Late Bloomers: The Power of Patience in a World Obsessed with Early Achievement by Rich Karlgaard

Lifescale: How to Live a More Creative, Productive, and Happy Life by Brian Solis

Let’s Talk Teams

In the wake of Tiger’s win at The Masters, we talk about the value of the people who surround us and how, together, we can do things we would never otherwise achieve.

How Will Doing What Anyone Can Do Possibly Help Me?

Great question.  One I’ve been asked many times.

In Joe Henderson’s 1976 book The Long Run Solution, he suggested that becoming truly accomplished at running (or at anything, for that matter) doesn’t typically require us to perform superhuman feats. We don’t have to leap tall buildings in a single bound. Success doesn’t ask us to do what no one else can do.  All too often, success and happiness find those who have the discipline to do the everyday things, the things anyone can do that most of us never will.

To keep it in Joe Henderson terms, let’s say you want to run a marathon. Until the 1980s, and well before IRONMAN competitions and ultra-marathons were part of the public consciousness, marathon running was considered extreme. It wasn’t something most people would even attempt. Only a freak, or someone who lacked any other mode of transportation, would choose to run 26.2 miles. With the advent of Team in Training, which has raised more than $1 billion for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society since 1988, marathon training programs for the average person became more prevalent.

In 1994, Oprah Winfrey showed the world that if you surround yourself with the right people and follow a training program, you, too, could run a marathon. (She also lost seventy-two pounds). The real challenge, of course, is sticking to the strict regimen required to get you ready for race day. Those of you who have done it know that the race is the easy part, relative to what it takes to prepare for it—sixteen to twenty-four weeks (depending on the program) of the daily discipline to do what anyone can do on a given day.

The wonderful part is that when you do the things anyone can do every day for four to five months, you can accomplish something almost no one can do. That’s the magic. The task is no different, whether you want to be an artist, a scholar, or a business leader. The question is: Are you willing to do the things anyone can do on a daily basis to achieve what you want in life? Because most people aren’t willing, doing what anyone can do puts you a step ahead of the rest.

How Can We Do Things Anyone Can Do More Often?

Surround Ourselves With the Right People.

Wanting something is one thing. Being committed to doing what it takes to make it happen is quite another. Left to our own devices, we all too often don’t do the work—or we don’t do it over a sustained period of time. We might get off to a good start, but we eventually succumb to whatever rationale we can conjure that explains why we stopped.

Even the most disciplined among us can benefit from involving our friends, family members, and colleagues in helping us achieve our goals. While we all know that no successful person in the history of the world ever accomplished anything totally by him- or herself, we see self-help as by-your-self-help.  As a result, we view our goals as solitary pursuits, and we don’t do the things anyone can do nearly often enough. This is why we fall short.

One thing we can do is seek out people who can play a positive role in our success and enlist their support. When we invite others to be our partners in success, they tend to help us do all those things anyone can.  And when we do, we give ourselves the best chance to achieve our goals whatever they may be.  That’s why doing what anyone can do help you HUGE!

*Includes excerpts from the book, What Anyone Can Do: How Surrounding Yourself With the Right People Will Drive Change, Opportunity, and Personal Growth.

The Power of Reframing

Okay, do you tend to see the glass as half empty or half full?   Check out this week’s conversation, where Randy and I talk about the power of reframing and how our circle of people can help us see the world to our advantage!

Links mentioned in today’s show:

Career Mastery Kickstart
May Busch, Host of Career Mastery Kickstart
Leo’s books: The Power of Peers and What Anyone Can Do